Over the last three months I’ve lost 22 pounds simply by upping my exercise and reducing bad calories. I’m 68 years old, always in good shape, but added sedentary pounds as I aged. (6 feet tall, 212 pounds before — 190 pounds now) I’ve generally restricted my diet to about 1200 calories a day — 200 – 300 for breakfast, 200 for lunch, and about 700 or less for the rest of the day. I try to vary the foods, do as much exercise as I can (biking, swimming, walking, weights). I drink as much non-caloric liquid as I can and I try to find food that fills me up — vegetables, fruits, mostly. I eat some cheese and a good hamburger occasionally, although I avoid most meat. I still work full time. I realize the discipline necessary, but it’s not that hard to do. I rely on a good scale and moderate my diet each day to keep a constant weight. My blood pressure has dropped from 130/80 to 117/72 and heart rate is resting 58. I’m lucky that my chronic diseases are not yet serious (osteoarthritis and borderline cholesterol, although I dont take statins because of reactions). I’m not a diet fadder, but using common sense goes a long way. Eat smart and work out. MM
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"The evidence that with knowledge already at our disposal, we could eliminate 80 percent of chronic disease is the basis for everything I do," Katz said. Just as he was finishing his residency in internal medicine in 1993, influential research in the Journal of the American Medical Association ("Actual Causes of Death in the United States") put diet on a short list of the lifestyle factors blamed for half of deaths in 1990. "Here we are more than 20 years later and we’ve made just about no progress."
This diet has some big guys behind it: The National Institutes of Health recommends TLC (Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes) for lowering your cholesterol and reducing your risk of heart disease—especially if you have risk factors like being a woman who is 55 or older, have a family history, or have high blood pressure. Following the diet—low in saturated fat and cholesterol, and focused on fiber—can lower your "bad" LDL cholesterol by 20 to 30 percent and allow you to take a smaller dose of cholesterol-lowering medication, the NIH reports.
Part of the problem, Katz says, is public confusion. New eating plans and “superfoods” are constantly cast as the keys to health, and consumers can feel overwhelmed by choice and information. The food industry, and its constant stream of new products and nutrition gimmicks, is complicit in this confusion, Katz says. But so are the researchers who set out to find something novel simply to generate publicity, he says, and the news outlets that cover them.

So, in the midst of this unexpected positivity, I got an email from Pamela Peeke, M.D. She wanted to have a call and give me some advice. In a very unlike-me move, I did not get to the email. I'm very good about responding to email, which has to be one of the lamest brags of all time, but in a world full of ghosting, I'm proud of my prompt replies. But I messed up, and a week and a half later, I got another email. Dr. Peeke wanted to make sure I got her message.

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