As a Spanish tourist in Los Angeles and a fanatic movie lover I committed a terrible mistake. I went to see "The Women" The remake of one of my all time favorites. I've seen the original many many times, in fact I own it. My rushing to see the remake was based on Diane English, the woman responsible for "Murphy Brown" My though was: how bad can it be? She must know what she's doing. Well, I don't know what to say. I don't understand what happened. The Botoxed women is a rather depressing affair. Meg Ryan or whoever played Mary - she looked a bit like a grotesque version of Meg Ryan...another actress perhaps wearing a Meg Ryan mask - she doesn't bring to the character nothing of what Norma Shearer did in 1939. The new one is a tired, unconvincing prototype of what has become a farce within a farce. The "friends" Annette Bening, Debra Messing, Jada Pinket Smith are as disconnected as anything I've ever seen and if this wasn't enough: Eva Mendes as Crystal, the character created by Joan Crawford in one of her best and funniest performances. Eva Mendes's casting is really the poster sign for how wrong, how ill conceived this commercial attempt turned up. I didn't give it a 1 out respect for Candice Bergen and Cloris Leachman

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"These diets are so restrictive that of course you're going to lose weight fast because you're not eating enough calories to sustain basic activities of your body, let alone any exercise. That's nothing that any person can sustain for the long term," Hogan said. "The weight's going to come back if you do lose any weight, and then it's going to be harder to lose weight in the future."
best way to lose weight

With every glass, this spa water is sure to refresh and rehydrate you. All it takes is one cinnamon stick and a red apple. This is all it takes to put together one of the finest detox water recipes known to women. Children especially adore these kinds of brews. As such, the weight-loss powers extend to all ages. The tastiness does not hurt this drinks positive reputation either. It is uniquely suited for the colder seasons, and it garners plenty of holiday cheer. Both of the essential components within this beverage automatically act as appetite suppressants, so snacking ceases to exist.

“When it comes to losing weight, what actually moves the needle is always dietary change,” says Caroline Cederquist, MD, a weight management specialist in Naples, Florida. People make the common mistake of going hard on exercise and then stopping when they don’t see results, she says. At the outset, focus your efforts towards changing what you eat, once you start to lose weight, then add exercise.

In a study on adults age 54 and over, people who had a higher marker for the stress hormone cortisol were more likely to weigh more, have a higher BMI and a larger waistline, according to UK researchers. High cortisol levels promote fat storage, particularly belly fat. Learning stress reduction strategies—and using them when necessary—can help you lose weight without needing to change your diet.


Low-calorie diets: It is harmful to reduce your daily calorie intake lower than 1400 calories per day, because your body adjusts to a semi-starvation state and looks for alternative sources of energy. In addition to burning fat, your body will eventually burn muscle tissue. Because your heart is a muscle, prolonged starvation will weaken it and interfere with its normal rhythms. Low-calorie diets don't meet the body's nutrition needs, and without nutrients your body cannot function normally.
Parsley has many, many health benefits, including reducing effects of diarrhoea, improving digestion, regulating the menstrual cycle and increasing the rate of urination, which means that more matter is expelled from the body, including more calories and thus reducing weight loss. The diuretic aspect of parsley juice also means that it detoxifies the body faster than other drinks, and acts as an appetite suppressant making you feel fuller than you are.

The formation is peculiar to English and Dutch. Replaced older Old English wif and quean as the word for "female human being." The pronunciation of the singular altered in Middle English by the rounding influence of -w-; the plural retains the original vowel. Meaning "wife," now largely restricted to U.S. dialectal use, is attested from mid-15c. Women's liberation is attested from 1966; women's rights is from 1840, with an isolated example in 1630s.

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