@Mark, Whey protein is fantastic as a meal replacement. When you’re on the cutting phase (dieting) to retain muscle mass, a protein supplement will help with this. Remember though, there is no substitute for food. Consider lean turkey or chicken breast (with the skin off) but half your normal portion with lots of green veggies (which also contains carbs and protein to help keep you fuller for longer!)
This high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carb fad diet sends the body into a state of ketosis, in which the body uses stored fat for energy. Research published in Clinical Cardiology suggests the ketogenic, or “keto,” diet can be an effective weight-loss method, but to be successful, you must follow the plan consistently with no cheat days — otherwise, you’re just eating a high-fat diet that may be high in unhealthy fats for no reason. (1)
DASH stands for "dietary approach to stop hypertension" and was created by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as a way to help reverse national trends of obesity and heart disease. Scientists combed through decades of research to come up with an expert-backed list of diet tips, along with a prescription for exercise. And it worked: The DASH diet has topped nearly every diet list for nearly a decade. Doctors particularly recommend it for people looking to lower high blood pressure, reverse diabetes, and lower their risk of heart disease. (Here's the basic list of DASH diet-approved foods.)
Although fewer females than males are born (the ratio is around 1:1.05), because of a longer life expectancy there are only 81 men aged 60 or over for every 100 women of the same age. Women typically have a longer life expectancy than men.[28] This is due to a combination of factors: genetics (redundant and varied genes present on sex chromosomes in women); sociology (such as the fact that women are not expected in most modern nations to perform military service); health-impacting choices (such as suicide or the use of cigarettes, and alcohol); the presence of the female hormone estrogen, which has a cardioprotective effect in premenopausal women; and the effect of high levels of androgens in men. Out of the total human population in 2015, there were 101.8 men for every 100 women.[29] 

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Diet fads are a dime a dozen and there’s always a hot new one around the corner with promises of trim waistlines and a cure for whatever ails you. Yet the reality is that there are so many diet plans out there because, well, most of them don’t work. Some offer quick fixes and dramatic weight loss, sure, but often lack sustainability — or worse, might come with health risks.
In fact, because energy drinks are marketed as dietary supplements, companies can sneak past regulations required by the Food and Drug Administration. The result? A crash-and-burn cocktail of excess caffeine, bogus “herbal blends” and enough sugar to make a packet of Skittles look like the better option. According to one study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, a typical energy drink can have as much as a quarter cup of sugar, and upwards of 200 mg of caffeine—more than you’ll find in two very strong cups of coffee (a tall cup has about 71 mg)!
Amelia is a writer/editor with an endless passion for bringing a lot of useful and trustworthy information to the community. She founded stayhealthyways.com, a blog dedicated to sharing quality articles related to health, nutrition, fitness, and beauty. As a typical introvert, Amelia is a perfectionist in work. At times of leisure, she reads, listens to music, chats with some close friends and walks with her pet.
So, in the midst of this unexpected positivity, I got an email from Pamela Peeke, M.D. She wanted to have a call and give me some advice. In a very unlike-me move, I did not get to the email. I'm very good about responding to email, which has to be one of the lamest brags of all time, but in a world full of ghosting, I'm proud of my prompt replies. But I messed up, and a week and a half later, I got another email. Dr. Peeke wanted to make sure I got her message.

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