Food for thought: Weight loss isn’t as simple as calories in and calories out. By bringing macronutrients into play, IIFYM makes sure you’re not just eating cookies and calling it a day. Still, some critics say the diet leaves plenty of room for junk food since you’re allowed to “eat whatever you want.” You also run the risk of depriving your body of the micronutrients it needs. The IIFYM diet plan could be right for you if you’re smart about it and eat quality, whole foods and avoid the junk, at least most of the time.
Forgive yourself. So you were going to have one cracker with spray cheese on it and the next thing you know the can's pumping air and the box is empty? Drink some water, brush your teeth, and move on. Everyone who's ever tried to lose weight has found it challenging. When you slip up, the best idea is to get right back on track and don't look back.

You don’t have to like cucumbers to fall madly in love with this unencumbered cucumber detox water. All of the rehydrating properties of this grand garden vegetable are masked under a guise of lively lemon and mystifying mint. These two inclusions add plenty of sweetness without resorting to the unnecessary contamination of artificial sugars. This refined beverage is typically reserved for classy spa environments, but it can be enjoyed anywhere on the move. For a full day of drinks, the recipe calls for 10 mint leaves, 1 wedged lemon and 1 sliced cucumber. Everything is collected within a sealed vial for chilled overnight storage.


How it works: By eating foods that haven’t been processed, cooked, genetically engineered or exposed to herbicides, your body will be at its healthiest because you’re optimizing your intake of nutrients and natural enzymes. The claim is that cooking kills most nutrients and enzymes in food, although there is scant scientific evidence that backs this up. The raw food diet can also be effective for weight loss since fruits and vegetables are low in calories.


It’s easy to see the front of a package and get lured in by misleading claims, particularly those that say they’re “free-from” something, says Taub-Dix. She points out that gluten-free foods may also be high in sugar, salt, calories, and fat and contain less fiber—and thus be weight-promoting. Reading the nutrition label will give you the real truth for what you’re buying. 

So, in the midst of this unexpected positivity, I got an email from Pamela Peeke, M.D. She wanted to have a call and give me some advice. In a very unlike-me move, I did not get to the email. I'm very good about responding to email, which has to be one of the lamest brags of all time, but in a world full of ghosting, I'm proud of my prompt replies. But I messed up, and a week and a half later, I got another email. Dr. Peeke wanted to make sure I got her message.

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