This plan isn't a new one: the Dissociated Diet was invented in 1911, but thanks to the popularity of "food science," (aka really looking at how different foods play with others), it's seen a resurgence. If you follow it, the main rule is not to combine acidic foods (think meats, fish, dairy) with alkaline ones (legumes, vegetables, nuts). Why? It's said to be easier on your digestive system, which in turn helps boost weight loss results (though, to be honest, the science behind this is controversial). Of course, you'll also load up on plenty of fruits and veggies, and since those are a part of any healthy diet, that certainly plays a role in any success you'll see.
Sure, you can lose weight quickly. There are plenty of fad diets that work to shed pounds rapidly -- while leaving you feeling hungry and deprived. But what good is losing weight only to regain it? To keep pounds off permanently, it's best to lose weight slowly. And many experts say you can do that without going on a "diet." Instead, the key is making simple tweaks to your lifestyle.
Talk about heart ache: high blood pressure stresses arteries, and can make you more susceptible to heart disease. To eat to lower your blood pressure, you just need to focus on heart-healthy bites. The American Heart Association recommends loading up on fruits, veggies, whole grains, low- or non-fat dairy, beans, lean meats, and fish. Bonus: no one's ever gotten fat eating more kale and beans.

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