Make sure that the diet has been studied extensively for safety — and discuss any changes with your physician or registered dietitian before beginning a new diet. (If you don’t have a dietitian, find one in your area at the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics website.) And do a self-check to ensure the diet fits with your own values and preferences.
First things first: there's no reason to go on this diet unless you suffer from symptoms of acid reflux (heartburn, upper abdominal pain). If you do, experts say that what you eat can make a huge difference in finding relief, especially if you don't want to rely on meds. So you'll eat fewer fatty, greasy foods—goodbye fast food—and avoid alcohol. Both changes can lead to one nice (but unintentional) side effect: weight loss.
Talk about heart ache: high blood pressure stresses arteries, and can make you more susceptible to heart disease. To eat to lower your blood pressure, you just need to focus on heart-healthy bites. The American Heart Association recommends loading up on fruits, veggies, whole grains, low- or non-fat dairy, beans, lean meats, and fish. Bonus: no one's ever gotten fat eating more kale and beans.

weight loss for women

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