The voices that carry the farthest over the sea of diet recommendations are those of iconoclasts—those who promise the most for the least, and do so with certainty. Amid the clamor, Dr. David Katz is emerging as an iconoclast on the side of reason. At least, that’s how he describes himself. From his throne at Yale University's Prevention Research Center, where he is a practicing physician and researcher, said sea of popular diet media is the institution against which he rebels. It’s not that nutrition science is corrupt, just that the empty promises of memetic, of-the-moment diet crazes are themselves junk food. To Katz they are more than annoying and confusing; they are dangerous injustice.
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How-life writer and unrepentant alcoholic Henry Chinaski was born to survive. After decades of slacking off at low-paying dead-end jobs, blowing his cash on booze and women, and scrimping by in flea-bitten apartments, Chinaski sees his poetic star rising at last. Now, at fifty, he is reveling in his sudden rock-star life, running three hundred hangovers a year, and maintaining a sex life that would cripple Casanova.
Earlier this month, the Endocrine Society released a scientific statement saying that people can lose weight on any of roughly a dozen diets assessed by its researchers. A study published in February, meanwhile, found near-identical weight-loss benefits from low-carb versus low-fat diets. Another paper, published just a week later, said vegetarian and Mediterranean diets are equally heart-healthy.
The Presidential Sports Award program was developed by the President's Council on Physical Fitness and Sports in 1972 in conjunction with national sports organizations and associations. The purpose of the program is to motivate Americans to become more physically active throughout life. It emphasizes regular exercise rather than outstanding performance. It is important that participants over the age of 40 who have not been active on a regular basis undergo a thorough medical examination before undertaking any physical activity program.
So, in the midst of this unexpected positivity, I got an email from Pamela Peeke, M.D. She wanted to have a call and give me some advice. In a very unlike-me move, I did not get to the email. I'm very good about responding to email, which has to be one of the lamest brags of all time, but in a world full of ghosting, I'm proud of my prompt replies. But I messed up, and a week and a half later, I got another email. Dr. Peeke wanted to make sure I got her message.

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